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Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures – Blu-ray Review

September 19, 2012 – 10:41 PM - Posted by: Justin Sluss

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Blu-ray Disc Review

4.5 out of 5 starsThe Movie Itself rated 8.7, 7.6, 8.3 & 6.4 on IMDb
4.5 out of 5 starsVideo Quality 1080p in AVC on FIVE 50gb discs
5 out of 5 starsAudio Quality
DTS-HD 5.1 Master Audio
4.5 out of 5 starsBonus Materials are great & around 7 HOURS long!
Rated:PG, PG, PG-13 & PG-13
Year: – 1981, 1984, 1989, 2008 (respectively)
Length: – 115, 118, 126 & 122 minutes (respectively)
Studio:Paramount
Region:Region Free (A/B/C)


Overall VerdictHighly Recommended

Buy it for $39.99 @ Amazon.com
Buy it for $39.99 @ Amazon.com


— Review written by: Justin Sluss

Blu-ray Trailer:


The Movies Themselves included “Raiders of the Lost Ark” from 1981, “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” from 1984, “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” from 1989, and “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” from 2008. I’ll be discussing each a tad bit first individually below and then at the very bottom discussing the whole box set (“Indiana Jones” franchise) of films and the actual Blu-ray Disc release itself.

Raiders of the Lost Ark” from 1981 was Directed by Steven Spielberg. The screenplay was written by Lawrence Kasdan with the story written by George Lucas and Philip Kaufman. The characters and cast for this, the first film, are as follows: “Indiana Jones” (played by Harrison Ford), “Satipo” (played by Alfred Molina), “Dr. Marcus Brody” (played by Denholm Elliott), “Marion Ravenwood” (played by Karen Allen), “Sallah” (played by John Rhys-Davies), “Colonel Dietrich” (played by Wolf Kahler) and “Dr. René Belloq” (played by Paul Freeman).

“Raiders of the Lost Ark” introduces us to our hero “Dr. Indiana Jones”, a professor of archeology that moonlights as an adventurer who carries a whip. The year is 1936 and after he returns from his latest adventure he’s back teaching at a university. After his class is over he’s told by his friend “Dr. Marcus Brody”, a museum curator, that the U.S. government is looking for the biblical artifact The Ark of the Covenant — the chest that carried the Ten Commandments. The two guys from the U.S. government tell Jones and Brody that they are in a race to acquire the item before Adolf Hitler’s Nazi agents do. Indy is hired by the government to search for the Ark. He first travels to Nepal where he meets up with an ex-flame by the name of “Marion Ravenwood” whose father had been his professor. However he and Marion parted on bad terms last time and she’s not exactly too happy to see him. She has an item that Indy needs and he tries his best to get it from her before the Nazis do. It takes some serious persuasion but he manages to convince Marion to sell him the item and she also joins him on his adventure. Their next stop is Cairo, Egypt where they meet up with one of Indy’s friends “Sallah” who helps with trying to find the Ark. Along the way they’ll have some encounters with a “Dr. Belloq” working with the Nazis. All this to try to find the Ark, before the Nazis. If they (the Nazis) manage to find it will not use it for good, that much is for sure.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” from 1984 was Directed by Steven Spielberg. The screenplay was written by Willard Huyck & Gloria Katz with the story written by George Lucas. The characters and cast for this, the second film, are as follows: “Indiana Jones” (again played by Harrison Ford), “Willie Scott” (played by Kate Capshaw), “Short Round” (played by Jonathan Ke Quan), “Mola Ram” (played by Amrish Puri), “Chattar Lal” (played by Roshan Seth) and “Little Maharaja” (played by Raj Singh).

“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” starts out by re-introducing us to our hero “Dr. Indiana Jones” as he’s in a Chinese night club in 1935. Indy is trying to having a negotiation with some Chinese gangsters but things don’t go quite as planned. He manages to end up fleeing with the night club singer “Willie” where they meet up with his 12-year-old Asian sidekick “Short Round” who helps drive them to the airport. They end up boarding a plane but the flight is cut short by some unusual circumstances and they find themselves in India. The three end up in a small village where they are told by the village elder as to why it is in ruins. He says that a sacred stone was taken from them as well as their children. Indy agrees to help the villagers find their missing stone and is soon on his way, along with Willie and Short Round, to the nearby Maharaja’s palace. Here they encounter the prime minister who offers to let them stay the night in the palace. Indy manages to find a secret passageway in one of the rooms and soon makes his way through many booby-traps. Eventually the three get to a large area where they find an ancient ceremony being led by a man named “Mola Ram” who’s able to tear human hearts out. They are making quite the sacrifices here and they also have something that is giving them power, three sacred stones. One of these stones is the missing stone from the village. Indy retrieves the stones and tries to make his way out of this “Temple of Doom” where he and his two friends find themselves trapped.

Indiana Jones and the The Last Crusade” from 1989 was Directed by Steven Spielberg. The screenplay was written by Jeffrey Boam with the story written by George Lucas and Menno Meyjes. The characters and cast for this, the third film, are as follows: “Indiana Jones” (yet again played by Harrison Ford), “Professor Henry Jones” (played by Sean Connery), “Dr. Marcus Brody” (played by Denholm Elliott), “Dr. Elsa Schneider” (played by Alison Doody), “Sallah” (played by John Rhys-Davies), “Walter Donovan” (played by Julian Glover), “General Vogel” (played by Michael Byrne) and “Young Indy” (played by River Phoenix).

“Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” starts out in a flashback to 1912 with a young “Indiana Jones” on an outing with the Boy Scouts. He and one of his fellow scouts manage to come across a group of men who have discovered a priceless Spanish artifact, the cross of Coronada. Indy doesn’t think that these men deserve such an item and that it belongs in a museum so he takes the cross when they aren’t looking. A chase soon follows. After this unfolds we flash forward to 1938 where Indy is being held captive on a boat, yet again over the cross that he stole back in 1912. He manages to escape the men holding him captive and eventually makes his way back home. Back at the university where Indy teaches we see him have a hectic day as usual. He decides to make an escape from his job when it becomes a bit too much. As he’s leaving the university three men come up to him and take him to a penthouse apartment. It’s here where he meets a man named “Walter Donovan”, who’s come across a 12th century stone marker that discusses the Holy Grail. He tells Indy of another marker that he believes to be in Venice, Italy in a tomb of a knight from the crusades. However a problem has occurred and his man leading the expedition has disappeared. Indy tells the man he’s got the wrong Dr. Jones for the project, as he believes his father is more suited for this. It’s much to Indy’s dismay that he is told his father was the one leading the expedition that has gone missing. Donovan asks if Indy will go to Italy and continue the work. He agrees to and is accompanied by his old friend “Dr. Marcus Brody”, the museum curator. Before Indy leaves though he receives a package from Italy, his father’s diary. He realizes that his father has sent this to him because he was worried it would fall into the wrong hands. Once Indy and Marcus arrive in Venice they are greeted “Doctor Elsa Schneider” who was working with Indy’s father. They go to a library where they manage to find some clues about the second marker. Some things happen here though and they soon get some resistance. Soon they realize that they are up against one of Indy’s old enemies, the Nazis. Along the way he’ll be reunited with his father who will help.

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” from 2008 was Directed by Steven Spielberg. The screenplay was written by David Koepp with the story written by George Lucas and Jeff Nathanson. The characters and cast for this, the fourth film, are as follows: “Indiana Jones” (yet again played by Harrison Ford), “Irina Spalko” (played by Cate Blanchett), “Mutt Williams” (played by Shia LaBeouf), “Marion Ravenwood” (played by Karen Allen), “‘Mac’ George Michale” (played by Ray Winstone) and “Professor Oxley” (played by John Hurt).

“Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” takes place in 1957 where we are re-introduced to an older “Indiana Jones” who’s being held captive by Russians (Soviet agents). The Soviet agents are led by a woman named “Iriana Spalko” and they are at a top secret hangar in the Nevada desert. They’ve taken Indy captive to lead them to a crate in the “Hangar 51″ (as it’s called, obviously referring to “Area 51″) that holds the body of an extraterrestrial being from the Roswell crash. The Soviets investigate the remains of the alien and Indy eventually tries to make an escape. Sufficed to say he manages to escape, as we’ve learn to expect from him. After being debriefed by the FBI he makes his way back to the university (Marshall College) where he teaches. Due to him being investigated by the FBI over the run-in with the Soviets he’s offered an indefinite leave from his teaching career. As he’s leaving town on a train he’s approached by a boy riding alongside his train car on a motorcycle. The boy, “Mutt Williams”, informs Indy that his old colleague “Professor Harold Oxley” has disappeared in Peru, where he discovered a mysterious crystal skull. This is enough to convince Indy to cancel his train ride. He and Mutt go to a diner to further discuss things. It’s here where Mutt gives Indy a letter from Oxley. As they’re talking in the diner a group of Soviet agents show up and give chase. It’s obvious to Indy that they’ve been trailing Mutt to lead them to him with hopes that he would decode Oxley’s letter. Basically what happens here in this adventure is that Indy ends up reuniting with an old-flame (“Marion Ravenwood”) and traveling to a pyramid in the Amazon rainforest where he’s trying to find the rest of the skeletal remains that go to the crystal skull Professor Oxley found. It’s believed that the crystal skull came from an extraterrestrial life form and Indy feels it’s his duty to prevent the Russians getting their hands on it; as it is said to hold great powers.

My ratings for the four films individually are as follows: “Raiders of the Lost Ark” earns a “5 Star Rating“, “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” earns a “5 Star Rating“, “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” earns a “5 Star Rating” and “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” earns a “4 Star Rating” — as it’s obviously the weakest of the four.

Overall the franchise proves to be very iconic, memorable and enjoyable — especially the first three films. The fourth film has some enjoyable moments to it but really feels like it’s trying too hard to carry on what those previous three films started. The fourth film pales in comparison to the first three films and is very unliked by most fans. This box set “Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures” on Blu-ray is a definite treat to all fans though, even if they have to repurchase the fourth film; which as I’ve said generally is disliked by a majority of fans. Regardless, it’s well worth it for the fans. This is what we’ve been waiting for.


Video Quality on each film is in full 1080p using the AVC MPEG-4 codec on a BD-50 (50 gigabyte dual-layered Blu-ray Disc) in the 2.35:1 aspect ratio — spanning across FOUR discs for the films and FIVE discs total. Disc 5 is used for bonus materials.

Disc Usage:

Disc 1 uses 34.9GB for the movie out of 36.9GB total. Disc 2 uses 36.4GB for the movie out of 37.7GB total.
Disc 3 uses 38.8GB for the movie out of 40.4GB total. Disc 4 uses 36.7GB for the movie out of 38.7GB total.
Disc 5 uses 35.1GB total for bonus materials.

Raiders of the Lost ArkVideo Quality:

Presented in the 2.35:1 aspect ratio, this got a meticulous frame-by-frame restoration. The original 35MM film negative was scanned at 4K resolution and damage was repaired. Many things were left as originally intended as to maintain the director’s vision. A great amount of film grain has been preserved. No real signs that DNR (digital noise reduction) was used, as I said things were cleaned up in a precise manner. This film, to be 31 years old, looks rather sharp with an excellent amount of detail; especially in close-ups which look very impressive. There’s a perfectly solid black level as dark as ink here, the color palette can be quite vibrant thanks to the jungle setting and fleshtones are accurate. A few instances can be found where things might seem a bit soft or out of focus and this can be at times possibly due to spherical lens blur. There’s really nothing at all to complain about here visually, in fact the visual special effects done by ILM (Industrial Light & Magic) near the end of the film still hold up rather well in Hi-Def and don’t show off many flaws. This restoration is very impressive and it’s been said that director Steven Spielberg and writer/executive producer George Lucas were pretty involved with the process. This by far is the best looking of the four films presented here in Hi-Def and it’s also the oldest. “Raiders of the Lost Ark” has never looked this good before and the fans are going to certainly enjoy this. It earns itself a perfect “5 Star Rating” for overall video quality.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of DoomVideo Quality:

Presented in the 2.35:1 aspect ratio, “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” received a new digital transfer and color correction. Speaking of which the color palette comes across vibrant for the most part, although it is a tad bit dull in the first bits in India. It’s actually the physical settings and costumes that cause that though, not the color palette. Things brighten up though 30 minutes in when they enter the jungles of India. The fleshtones are accurate and the black level is solid. A good amount of film grain has been preserved here. This presentation in Hi-Def looks great with lots of detail throughout and no visual flaws. Despite the dark settings of the temple where the ceremonies take place things look really impressive. The visual special effects done by the folks at ILM hold up for the must part but there are a few scenes near the end of the film that feel a bit dated. Still, they work. This earns itself a very nice “4.5 Star Rating” for overall video quality. It doesn’t look quite as impressive as “Raiders of the Lost Ark” but it does look very impressive none-the-less.

Indiana Jones and the Last CrusadeVideo Quality:

Presented in the 2.35:1 aspect ratio, “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” received a new digital transfer and color correction. Things start out with a very vibrant color palette in the opening scene of the film. This boasts a solid black level and holds accurate fleshtones. A good amount of film grain has been left intact here which is sure to please purists. Very little visible flaws have been left on the film print. The new digital transfer looks really impressive and has a very good amount of detail in every shot, especially in close-ups. There’s a scene involving airplanes that uses some special effects that feels a bit dated in a few shots but this scene isn’t that long thankfully. No other scenes with special effects really feel too dated, just that one. This is just as visually pleasing as the second film and earns itself yet another very impressive “4.5 Star Rating” for overall video quality.

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal SkullVideo Quality:

Presented in the 2.35:1 aspect ratio, they decided even though it was 2008 and digital had become mainstream to try to maintain the visual feel the first three films had by shooting this on 35MM film. It paid off as this looks very impressive. The black level is solid, the color palette is vibrant and the fleshtones are accurate. There’s a great amount of detail to be found here, especially in close-ups. The special effects have obviously improved over the years and come across a bit more believable. There’s a slight amount of film grain visible here but not quite as much as found in the first three films. This appears to be the exact same digital transfer found on the 2008 Blu-ray release. Just as it did back then, this earns itself yet another impressive “4.5 Star Rating” for overall video quality.

Overall Video Quality:

ALL FOUR films here look great. There’s no doubt in that. However, the most impressive Hi-Def presentation comes from the first film which received a very nice restoration. The second and third films received nice digital transfers and color correction which really pay off visually. The fourth film is identical to how it looked on its previous Blu-ray release. All and all, averaged up, these four films earn an impressive “4.5 Star Rating” for overall video quality. Someday they might go back and give the second and third film restorations like the first film received but they look great for now. Fan will be pleased with the Hi-Def presentation here across all four films.


Audio Quality on this release is presented in DTS-HD 5.1 Master Audio for each of the FOUR films included. ALL FOUR films are presented in THX approved audio transfers.

Raiders of the Lost ArkAudio Quality:

Not only did “Raiders of the Lost Ark” receive a visual restoration but it received an audio restoration as well. New stereo surrounds were created using the original music tracks and original sound effects. Sound effects, which were originally recorded in stereo, had previously only been used in mono. This time around they (sound effects) were used in their original stereo form. The LFE (bass) track was entirely redone (“up to modern specifications”). Some work was done to improve the dialogue and fix some minor technical flaws as well. This new 5.1 lossless sound mix was done using the sound designer Ben Burtt‘s original master mix; which had actually been archived and unused since 1981.

Things in the film start up really nicely during the opening credit sequence with an immediate hefty amount of LFE, excellent rear channel use for the sound effects & other ambient noise as well as the original music (score) by John Williams. The majority of Williams’ original score is delivered through the front left and right channels. Dialogue and other vocal elements such as screams are distinctly delivered from the center channel speaker. Despite this being a very loud and intense mix, the dialogue is never once overpowered by the sound effects or music. Dialogue is “spot on” throughout the film and no volume adjustments will need to be made. Just a minute or so in and the mix is already intense and sure to impress most anyone. Both the sound effects and music intensify though as things progress. By the 7 minute mark you’ll start to hear what I mean. The music gets a great amount of LFE and rear channel presence as it begins to intensify. Things do settle down for a bit a rely mostly on dialogue but the rear channels still manage to get use for background chatter and such during these instances. Around 22 minutes or so in it starts to really liven back up. Indy’s whip sound effect sounds awesome just as you’d expect during an action scene around the 31 minute mark. You’ll also notice that gunshots as well as the bullets themselves ricocheting around the bar sound very impressive in that scene. 38 minutes in you’ll start to notice that Indy’s punches now pack a bit more “oomph” to them in terms of LFE. Explosions also sound very cool. There are other highlights worth noting such as 59 minutes in during an electrical storm where the 5.1 mix is nicely used to deliver wind through the rear channels, as well as echoes of the thunder.

The mix itself ranges from intense to border-lining on creepy for a bit, beautiful in terms of music and all the way back to intense. The action sequences all sound just as impressive as you’d expect. John Williams’ original score really builds up to a climax a few times in the last 30 or 40 minutes of the film. That unforgettable theme sounds terrific here throughout the film. This mix is downright awesome and totally does the film justice. “Raiders of the Lost Ark” earns itself a perfect “5 Star Rating” for overall audio quality.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of DoomAudio Quality:

The audio comes from a Dolby source according to IMDb. The mix starts out with an impressive amount of rear channel and LFE during the musical number in the opening credits. After that John Williams’ original score comes across very impressive with great rear channel and LFE as well. Dialogue is delivered very distinctly. The sound effects during the first action sequence come across nicely. Gunshots, breaking glass and whatnot here sound very cool. The car chase that follows is intense. 37 minutes in the music sounds great as they arrive at the palace. The bats flying overhead sound very creepy. Willie’s screams are pretty crazy and help build suspense as well as provide a bit of comedic relief. The booby traps in the hidden passageway have some great LFE and rear channel presence to them about 1 hour in. The ceremonies inside the temple sound very creepy with the drums getting a good amount of LFE. Once again Indy‘s whip sounds great. A bit past the 1 hour mark the sound of screams from slaves will echo throughout the rear channels. The sound effects here come across very realistic. Williams’ score will continue to set the mood perfectly throughout the latter half of the film and is done justice by this excellent 5.1 lossless mix. The mining cart chase scene is downright intense. “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” earns itself a perfect “5 Star Rating” for overall audio quality.

Indiana Jones and the Last CrusadeAudio Quality:

The audio comes from a Dolby source according to IMDb. The original music (Score) here by John Williams starts out a tad mellow but still comes across somewhat bright with a good amount of rear channel presence and LFE. Sound effects likes cars and trains in the very opening of the film feel realistic. Once we flash forward to 1938 the rain storm around 12 minutes in sounds great with both the wind and waves crashing against the boat getting a nice amount of rear channel presence and the waves getting a excellent amount of LFE. Explosions here throughout the film sound great. Dialogue is delivered very distinctly through the center channel and is never overpowered by any of the action throughout. Aside from the the first 11 minutes or so, the mix goes a while before coming too intense. Around the 37 minute mark things pick back up so-to-speak in a boat chase. That particular scene has a good amount of rear channel presence and LFE to it. More sound effects along the way such as explosions and gunfire also feel realistic and Indy‘s whip sounds great as usual. The scene around an hour in with the motorcycle chase sounds very cool. Another scene that sounds very cool involves a plane chase. It has some excellent use of the rear channels and very impressive sound effects such as the gunfire from the Nazi plane. The real highlight of this mix though comes in a scene near the end of the film involving a tank. This action sequence boasts some very impressive LFE, not just from the tank and such but also from the punches — with pack quite a bit of “oomph” to them. The music really seems to also peak during this particular scene and uses the rear channels quite well. All and all “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” earns itself a perfect “5 Star Rating” for overall audio quality.

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal SkullAudio Quality:

The audio for the fourth film comes from a variety of surround sources (Dolby Digital, DTS and SDDS). In its 2008 Blu-ray release it was presented in Dolby TrueHD 5.1 but this time around it is presented in DTS-HD 5.1 Master Audio. This doesn’t necessarily come as much of an improvement, as it already sounded great before. It just keeps the audio codec continuity across all four films. Once again John Williams‘ original Score (music) sounds excellent with a great amount of fidelity, rear channel presence and LFE to it. Dialogue is delivered distinctly through the front center channel and never once is overpowered by any of the action or music. Speaking of action, sound effects here come across very impressive and make excellent use of the 5.1 soundscape. The sword fights between Mutt and Spalko are very impressive with a nice bright “clang” to them. The sound of gunfire is pretty intense as well as the punches which pack that almost exaggerated amount of “oomph” to them via LFE. This was one of the first, if not perhaps the first, THX certified (approved) audio presentations on the Blu-ray format. The amount of LFE (bass) here really packs quite the punch. “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” holds up just as impressive as it did back in 2008 in terms of sound and earns itself a perfect “5 Star Rating” for overall audio quality.

Overall Audio Quality:

ALL FOUR films boast excellent sound presentations and all are worthy of “5 Star Ratings” for overall audio quality. That being said, it’s pretty easy to average that up to perfect.


Bonus Materials are presented in both Hi-Def (HD) and Standard Definition (SD) video quality with Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo @224kbps sound — unless noted otherwise in the descriptions below.

DISC 1 (“Raiders of the Lost Ark“) includes:

  • Teaser Trailer (1:03 – HD)
  • Theatrical Trailer (2:33 – HD with Dolby Digital 5.1 @640kbps sound.
  • Re-Issue Trailer (1:45 – HD)

DISC 2 (“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom“) includes:

  • Teaser Trailer (1:00 – HD)
  • Theatrical Trailer (1:26 – HD) with Dolby Digital 5.1 @640kbps sound.

DISC 3 (“Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade“) includes:

  • Teaser Trailer (1:28 – HD)
  • Theatrical Trailer (2:13 – HD)

DISC 4 (“Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull“) includes:

  • Theatrical Trailer #2 (1:54 – HD) with Dolby Digital 5.1 @640kbps sound.
  • Theatrical Trailer #3 (1:57 – HD) with Dolby Digital 5.1 @640kbps sound.
  • Theatrical Trailer #4 (1:42 – HD) with Dolby Digital 5.1 @640kbps sound.

DISC 5Bonus Features” contains:

  • On Set with Raiders of the Lost Ark” is NEW and was recorded back in 1980 on the various sets of the film. This hour long featurette, or documentary rather, includes previously unreleased on set footage, Outtakes, Deleted Scenes as well as interviews and conversations on set with Steven Spielberg (director), Harrison Ford (“Indiana Jones“), George Lucas (executive producer / writer), Robert Watts (associate producer), Paul Freeman (“Belloq“), Norman Reynolds (production designer), Glenn Randall (stunt coordinator) and Karen Allen (“Marion Ravenwood“). The majority of this is presented in 4×3 (1.33:1 aspect ratio) but the outtakes and deleted scenes are actually presented in the 2.35:1 aspect ratio that the film is in. This is split up into two parts which are listed below:
    1. – “From Jungle to Desert” (29:35 – HD)
      – “From Adventure to Legend” (28:17 – HD)

    Making the Films” includes:

  • The Making of Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)” (57:48 – SD) is a documentary which was previously unavailable on the DVD release.
  • The Making of Raiders of the Lost Ark” (50:52 – SD)
  • The Making of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (41:09 – SD)
  • The Making of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (35:03 – SD)
  • The Making of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (28:49 – HD)
  • Behind the Scenes” includes:

  • The Stunts of Indiana Jones” (10:56 – SD)
  • The Sound of Indiana Jones” (13:21 – SD)
  • The Music of Indiana Jones” (12:22 – SD)
  • The Light and Magic of Indiana Jones” (12:22 – SD)
  • Raiders: The Melting Face!” (8:12 – SD)
  • Indiana Jones and the Creepy Crawlies” (11:46 – SD) features an optional Pop-Up Trivia track.
  • Travel with Indiana Jones: Locations” (9:58 – SD) features an optional Pop-Up Trivia track.
  • Indy‘s Women: The American Film Institute Tribute” (9:15 – SD)
  • Indy‘s Friends and Enemies” (10:10 – SD)
  • Iconic Props” (9:52 – HD) is for “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” specifically.
  • The Effects of Indy” (22:34 – HD) is for “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” specifically.
  • Adventures in Post Production” (12:36 – HD) is for “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” specifically.

Overall, the bonus materials here prove to be really informative, entertaining and by all means worthwhile. The newly released hour-long “On Set with Raiders of the Lost Ark” is a very nice addition and sure to leave fans extremely pleased, as well as the inclusion of the original 1981 “Making Of” for that film which had not previously been released on the DVD format. There’s hours upon hours of bonus materials here. In fact, the sticker on the packaging claims there to be a total of 7 hours which I think is pretty accurate. Each film has its share of bonus content specific to it included. That being said, there are some things sadly missing here. Looking back over the original Blu-ray 2-disc set release of “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom Crystal Skull” I’ve noticed that some of the featurettes from it are not included here. Sure, some of them are but not all of them. If they had been included this would have earned this box set a perfect rating for bonus. Even if they are for the film that is the least popular, it’s no excuse to have not included them here. However, as I’d said earlier in this review a lot of you perhaps already own that 2008 Blu-ray of the fourth film and actually have those bonus materials missing or just may not care; as you dislike the film. Regardless this includes enough supplemental material to keep fans pleased long after they’ve finished watching the films.


Blu-ray Disc packaging:

Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging

Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging Indiana Jones The Complete Adventures Blu-ray packaging


Raiders of the Lost Ark” Screenshots:


Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” Screenshots:


Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” Screenshots:


Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” Screenshots:

NOTE: The full-sized 1920×1080 files are in a .PNG file format and uncompressed. Apologies for the the slow loading times, keep in mind these files are at least 1MB (1 megabyte) in size each.

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